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Your Lawn in March

Here’s how to look after your lawn this March:
  • • Recut any lawn edges if necessary.
  • • Install lawn edging to make future maintenance easier.
  • • Mow your lawn if it needs it. Choose a dry day and set your blades higher than usual.
  • • Lay new turf if the ground isn’t frozen or waterlogged.
  • • Prepare soil for growing new lawn from seed. Doing this now allows it time to settle before sowing.

Some other jobs for February

Here are some of the other jobs to do around the garden this February:
  • • Trim deciduous hedges before the birds start nesting.
  • • Cut back vines such as ivy, Virginia creeper and Boston ivy. Doing this now helps keep windows, gutters and roof tiles clear.
  • • Shred or chop any woody prunings before you add them to compost bins, as this will help speed up decomposition.
  • • Wash empty pots by scrubbing them with hot water and a mild detergent. Rinse them well afterwards.

Time to Prepare

Use February to get yourself properly prepared for springtime. The following jobs will set you up for your best growing season yet:
  1. Prepare your seed beds. As long as the ground isn’t frozen, you can cultivate beds and start to warm up the soil, with fleece, polythene or cloches, in preparation for sowing in the coming months.
  2. Organise this year’s seeds by sowing date. Get hold of a box with dividers, and file your seed packets by the month they need to be sown in. You’ll be so glad of this effort in the weeks to come.

More jobs for February



  • • Prune wisteria now, cutting back summer side-shoots to 2 or 3 buds.
  • • Cut back shrubs, such as cornus and salix cultivars (grown for their colourful winter stems), down to their bases.
  • • Prune summer-flowering clematis towards the end of the month, before active growth begins.
  • • Cut back the old foliage from ornamental grasses before growth begins. Clip them to within a few centimetres of the ground.
  • • Prune overwintered fuchsias back to one or two buds on each shoot.

Frost isn't your lawns friend

Looking after your lawn

Remember to keep off the grass when there’s a frost, as the blades are more susceptible to damage.

With spring on the way it’s worth preparing your lawn for the season ahead. Try installing lawn edging, which gives a neat and tidy appearance and makes maintenance easier.

April in the Vegetable Garden

In the vegetable garden
Dig in a 5cm (or more) layer of compost, well rotted manure or green waste into your beds to prepare for the growing season.
Plant your chitted potatoes outside in the ground or in potato grow bags.
Harvest asparagus spears when they are no more than 18cm tall.
For quick and easy pea supports push some twiggy sticks around your pea plants now.
Thin your carrot seedlings to achieve good-size carrots - do this in the evening when fewer carrot flies are around.

Bring your lawn to life

Looking after your lawn
Sow lawn seed now on well prepared soil and keep the soil moist whilst the seed is germinating.
For an instant lawn, lay new turf now and ensure it is kept moist until established.
Repair any bare patches in your lawn.
Apply a high-nitrogen fertiliser to your lawn now for a boost to the start of the season.
Now is a good time to apply specialist lawn weed killers to your lawn where moss and weeds are a problem.
On dry days, brush away any 

April Tips in The Garden

In the flower garden
Plant lily bulbs now in pots! If you want to get ahead with your summer lily display, start planting now! I’d always recommend planting in pots. You can simply move them around the patio or into gaps in your borders as they come into flower! Use a good, multi-purpose compost and half-fill a container at least 30cm (12”) in diameter and is sufficient for 3 bulbs. Cover with more compost and water in. Once the plants begin to shoot, move them to a sunny position. Feed with a liquid plant feed each weekly from the beginning of summer.

Box is Back

April 2018
Start Planting Buxus Again
Once a beautiful feature in many UK gardens, whether used as a low dividing hedge, styled into topiary shapes or simply as a feature bush; box bush declined due to the box bush fungus cylindrocladium buxicola which decimated buxus plants throughout Europe. Read on to find out how you can once again grow the beautiful boxwood shrub without fearing box blight, thanks to TopBuxus…
TopBuxus is Europes largest Box grower, based in the Netherlands they grow 12,000,000 yes that’s twelve million boxwood shrubs each year.
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Your Lawn in March
Some other jobs for February
Time to Prepare
More jobs for February
Frost isn't your lawns friend

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